interaction

PROMPT: CHANGE IN YOU

The prompt for the weekly meeting began with a reading from The Shape of Water novelization by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus.

When did department stores replace their overhead lights with supernovas? For how long has the binned fruit wept at its own beauty? At what point did baked goods begin sighing sugary sweets into a cloud that beaded upon her face like happy tears? When did shoppers, those disapproving ladies with bulky purses and rude carts, transform into women who smiled at her, insisted she go first, complimented her on her choices? Perhaps they’d seen what Elisa saw reflected in butcher counter glass: not a timid huncher hiding her throat scars, but a woman straight of back pointing out the cuts of fish and meat she wanted. Quite a lot of both, the butcher probably thought, but why not? Surely a woman like this had a hungry man waiting at home. And she did. Elsa laughs. She did.

The point of departure is to write from the idea that the change in you changes how other people interact with you.

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Prompt: The Party Conversation

The prompt this week was to imagine observing two people in a party or large social event having an emotional interaction, displaying physical signs of frustration, distress, anxiety, etc. It looks normal, but isn’t. Show us so we can tell what is going on.

Prompt: Writing Letters You Might Never Send

This week’s prompt talked about how we communicate? What do we use to communicate? Eyes, attention, body language, respect, support, and words.

You can communicate with a person and have it be a very intimate connection. You may also connect with someone and have it be a one way experience.

There are many ways to communicate with each other, as there is with your characters. How do they communicate with each other?

As a writer, how do you connect on a deeper level to your readers? Sometimes you write to a specific person, even if you are writing for many. Others say they write to and for themselves.

The prompt narrowed down to this:

Write a letter to yourself or someone else that speaks the truth, says what you really wish to tell them, no holds barred.

It could be a letter sent, or one that is written and never sent. It doesn’t matter.

If you’d like to experiment with character building, have your main character or any character in your story write that letter.