Prompt-a-Month: The Letter Opened

Writers in the Grove Prompt-a-Month badge.The August prompt-a-month for our Writers in the Grove members is:

“You opened my letter…”

Writers in the Grove members may hand in their submissions during the workshops or use our members only submission form. Check out the guidelines and instructions for submissions in the announcement.

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PROMPT FOR JULY 30,2018: THERE WERE TWO PROMPTS GIVEN TODAY.

Prompt 1:

  • List two to three things you thought you would achieve in life but never did. Think of career goals or dreams you had when you were young.
  • List two to three things you did in fact achieve that you never anticipated.
  • Write about one of them or make observations on several of them and what it says about who you came to be.

 

Prompt 2:

  • Gremlins in your house 🙂

There seem to be universal experiences we all have, such as setting a cup of coffee down and then not being able to remember where we left it. Or how the car keys keep getting lost. It’s those mysterious and unseen Gremlins in the house we blame for these acts.

Write on your encounters with these events and how they affect you and those around you.

 

PROMPT: WRITE ABOUT A “FIRST” EVENT IN YOUR LIFE

The prompt for last Monday’s meeting was to write about a “first” event or experience in your life.

For example it could be about your first car, or your first kiss.

  • Make a list of three or four “first” events or experiences from your life.
  • Choose one from your list and write about it. Describe what you felt at the time or how it impacted you.

 

PROMPT: MOMENTS, NOT WORDS

Today’s prompt is from the book “The Book of Awakening”, by Mark Nepo.

Moments, Not Words

Like the moon,
come out from behind
the clouds! And Shine!
      – BUDDHA

When I think of those who’ve taught me how to love, moments come to mind, not words. As far back as grade school, when Lorrie wouldn’t stop spinning when recess ended. Spinning to a deeper, higher call she laughed, her little head back, her arms wide, trying to hug the world.

Then, the day Kennedy was shot, there was my choir teacher, Mr. P., crying for a man he didn’t know, letting us go home, but I came back to hear him play a sad piano to what he thought was an empty room. And Grandma holding my little hands open on her basement steps, saying, “These are the oldest things you own.”

Or the changing faces I would wake to at the foot of my bed while recovering from surgery. Or my father-in-law watering black walnuts six inches high that wouldn’t be fully grown for a hundred and fifty years. Or my oldest friend who always listens like a lake.

Though words can carry love, they often point to it. It is the picking up of something that has dropped, and the giving of space for someone to discover for themselves what it means to be human, and the forgiving of mistakes when we realize that we’ve done.

 

Prompt-a-Month: First Thoughts

Writers in the Grove Prompt-a-Month badge.The July prompt-a-month for our Writers in the Grove members is:

What is the first thought when the alarm goes off in the morning?

Writers in the Grove members may hand in their submissions during the workshops or use our members only submission form. Check out the guidelines and instructions for submissions in the announcement.

ANOTHER SIDE

The following was inspired by the prompt, Both Sides, and is by Writers in the Grove member, ralph cuellar.

Regardless of how intently i stare ahead
it’s always hindsight that has the better view
“Why is that”, i ask
and then upon reflection realize
… “why yes, of course”

Nature does not wait to be regarded
The future never arrives before its time
My thoughts fill my pockets and
occasionally spill out and get left behind
It’s not uncommon to come upon them again
only to discover they have another side

PROMPT: PANTOUM

Today the group explored the poetic form known as Pantoum.

Although it originated in Malaysia in the fifteenth-century as a short folk poem, the modern pantoum is a poem of any length, composed of four-line stanzas in which the second and fourth lines of each stanza serve as the first and third lines of the next stanza. The last line of a pantoum is often the same as the first.

The exercise is to create a pantoum of 3 stanzas:

  • Write six fairly short lines on the same subject (numbered 1-6).
  • To make the first stanza, copy the first 4 lines from your list of 6.
    • line 1
    • line 2
    • line 3
    • line 4
  • The second stanza has the following formula:
    • line 2
    • line 5
    • line 4
    • line 6
  • The third stanza has the following formula:
    • line 5
    • line 3
    • line 6
    • line 1

 

The suggested subject for the exercise was Father’s Day, but you can choose any subject you like.

Have fun and see what you get!